16 Inspiring Frittatas with Helpful Tips and Tricks

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breakfast frittata

Frittatas have always been a regular staple in my house, for as long as I can remember my whole married life I’ve been making them. Over the years my technique has evolved and I probably can make them in my sleep now.

What I like about frittatas is that they make a hearty breakfast, they can become an amazing brunch, a very satisfying lunch and a casual and light dinner.

Right now as I write this we are all living in uncharted waters, trying to navigate our lives through this horrible virus that’s attacking the earth. We want to nurture our loved ones and cooking is one of the ways to do that.

Frittatas don’t take a lot of energy to make, and in times of stress that’s a good thing. You don’t need to go out and buy fancy ingredients, in fact you’d be surprised how little you actually need. The key ingredients would be of course eggs, maybe some leftover veggies you don’t want to waste or some odds and ends of cheese wrapped up in the fridge. All these things can be transformed into an amazing meal to feed your family.

I hope to give you some inspiration with some of the ingredients I’ve used. The above frittata was made with a yellow pepper, cherry tomatoes, prosciutto, fontina and pecorino.

 

caprese frittata

My caprese frittata made here with the three basics ingredients of tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and fresh basil, I could eat this anytime of the day.

squash and sausage

Keep in mind if you make these throughout the year like I do, no doubt you’ll be using seasonal veggies as well.

This frittata is a hearty meal of pre-cooked crumbled Italian sausage, roasted butternut squash, a handful of spinach, pecorino and shredded mozzarella.

artichoke and asparagus

I actually made this one the other day with some leftover cooked artichoke hearts that I had, a few stalks of roasted asparagus with some cherry tomatoes.

One ingredient constant in all my frittatas is grated pecorino, to me its like Emeril’s ”BAM !”

tomato feta

This one has a Greek flavor profile with feta cheese, red onion and tomato wedges, feta is fantastic in frittatas!

delicata squash

I love squash and delicata squash is no exception, I make it during the fall and winter a lot by roasting it, and always have leftovers. Here it is with roasted cauliflower and spinach. This time I used cheddar with a mix of mozzarella and pecorino of course, because what can I say, it just enhances the whole frittata!

Oh and yes you can eat the delicate skin on the squash!

 

sheet pan frittata

My go to pan is always an oven safe skillet, mostly 10 inch, sometimes 12 inch but I’ve also made them in a quarter sheet pan which is fun. You can have fun creating a little scene with all the veggies, great if you’re feeding a group, just double the egg amount.

This one is filled with fresh roasted asparagus, a handful of frozen peas, red onion, herbs, cherry tomatoes with pecorino and mozzarella.

spring veg

I call this my spring frittata, it has beautiful melted brie cheese with shaved asparagus, peas and cherry tomatoes. The shaved asparagus gives it a really special look and it tastes amazing!

zucchini feta

Pan sautéed zucchini coins with cherry tomatoes, goat cheese, pecorino and cheddar.

brussel bacon

Hearty and delicious roasted brussels sprouts leaves with cooked chopped bacon, mozzarella and pecorino.

heirloom tomato

When tomato season is here remember this frittata made with sliced heirlooms, cheddar, pecorino and basil.

zucchini flowers

I look forward to making this when delicate zucchini blossoms start to appear along with sautéed zucchini coins, pecorino, basil and fresh mozzarella.

 

spiralized

Speaking of zucchini, this frittata is made with spiralized zucchini, fresh herbs, tomato slices, mozzarella, pecorino and shaved parm on top. 

pepper rings

Roasted mini colored peppers with peas, pecorino and mozzarella with a green salad plopped on top, which by the way is a fun way to eat a frittata.

I often mix up some arugula with just lemon and olive oil and plop it on top of mine.

 

broccolini

Roasted broccolini with red pepper, mushrooms, fresh mozzarella and pecorino.

 

shiitake mushrooms

And lastly an earthy frittata made with shiitake mushrooms, goat cheese and spinach, feel free to use any mushroom you have, leaving some whole for a nice presentation.

HERE ARE SOME OF MY TIPS AND TRICKS FOR MAKING FOOL PROOF FRITTATAS.

  • Always use an oven proof skillet ( 10 inch if you want it thicker, 12 inch if you want it thinner)
  • Have pre-cooked fillings ready ( you can use frozen veggies if that’s all you have, just saute them in a little olive oil for flavor)
  • Use fresh tomatoes and herbs
  • Use various cheeses of your choice ( cheddar, mozzarella, fresh or shredded, brie, feta, fontina, gouda, you get the picture)
  • Use 6 eggs scrambled with a dash of water from the tap ( I never use milk or cream in my frittatas)
  • Start out by drizzling olive oil in the bottom of your pan, if using onions start out sauteing them first then place your veggies all around the way you want your frittata to look, sort of like painting on a canvas.
  • Pour your scrambled eggs gently over the tops of your veg.
  • Heat should be medium lowish
  • Sprinkle with grated pecorino or parmesan
  • Add some salt and black pepper

Heat up your broiler.

When the eggs start to set a little it’s time for the broiler, so shut the flame off the stove. At this time I like to take some tongs and gently lift up some of my vegetables, otherwise they all get buried under the egg mixture and you won’t have a pretty presentation or see any of the veg popping out.

Next you want to strategically place whatever cheese you’re using all around trying not to bury everything, then add maybe a quick drizzle of olive oil and some more pecorino.

Speaking of broiler, I always finish my frittatas under the broiler, I’m not a flipper, I prefer the presentation you achieve from using the broiler.

One important note; don’t leave the broiler! keep opening the door to see how golden it’s getting, ovens vary so don’t leave the scene! You want a nice golden color from the melted cheese.

Test the center to see if any egg runs, if so put it back in for a few seconds.

Take it out and let it rest for 5 or 10 minutes, garnish with herbs if you like.

Frittatas can be eaten warm, at room temperature, or cold right from the fridge.

To round out the meal even more you can add some crusty bread and a salad.

Enjoy!

Follow me on Instagram to see what else I’m cooking up during the week.

 

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Comments

  1. These are beautiful! I see many frittatas in my future. Thank you for the inspiration.

  2. All of these look wonderful….but now while we have to shelter in place or stay home with limited trips to the grocery store could you suggestion a frittata with simple, easy to acquire ingredients? These are not the shop as usual days. Thank you.

    • Dee, the whole reason for this post is to encourage you to use up what you have. Frozen veggies or fresh, a little bit of this and that. None of these frittatas use a great amount of anything, one pepper, a few cherry tomatoes, a couple of mushrooms. It’s meant to inspire you to use what you have on hand and to create a hearty meal for your family.

  3. What a wonderful post. I love frittatas and anything eggy. I can now call you the Frittata queen and dub you as such! So many tasty ideas. My mamma always loved making her asparagus frittata in the spring. I know what I’m having for brunch on Sunday. How are you coping?

  4. Wonderful frittata combinations, Marie! My husband uses a plate to flip them, so I let him do that part. Whenever I try to broil them they burn. I guess my electric oven broiler is too hot. I love an asparagus and mushroom combination, and sometimes we add leftover pasta to our frittatas–it is so good!

  5. I love frittatas, too but it’d been a while since I’d made one. But now that I’m cooking more often than ever, they’ve become a staple in our diet once again. Their versatility is truly amazing.

  6. Eileen Kostock says

    What a great post! I can’t wait to try all of these frittatas; they are all so beautiful. First on my list is the prosciutto one. Then the spring one, then the summer one with tomatoes, then the asparagus one, then the broccoli one, then the brussels sprout one, then the….lol. You are so creative. I love all your ideas and can’t wait to try them all. Frittata was always the dinner my brother Skip would request whenever he stayed with me. He even had me teach him how to make a frittata, so he could make them at home. And we always had a simple side salad of cherry tomatoes with a vinaigrette dressing. Thanks for the sweet memories and the delicious inspirations!

  7. Enjoyed reading this! We have frittata quite often too. I find it is a way to use up leftovers and get my husband to eat veggies.
    My mom used to make an asparagus frittatas all the time. Yours always look so vibrant! Have a Happy Easter and Stay Safe!

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