Ravioli, A Yearly Holiday Tradition

homemade ravioli This is the time of year I love making ravioli just before Thanksgiving, it’s tradition in my house. I remember as a kid white sheets on top of tables all over our house that were filled with ravioli made together by my mother and aunt. I have their recipe and I hold it near and dear to my heart.

They always made two different kinds of ravioli, meat and cheese and that’s what I make to this very day, and I have to say that their recipe never ever fails me.

Although I like to use different fillings and be adventurous now and then, when I’m with my family and cousins on my side it’s tradition that we use their special recipe which stirs up great memories for all of us.

I’ve learned a lot of tips and tricks over the years, many I have shared on this blog, like how to make ravioli for a crowd  (and not lose your mind!) It’s not as hard as you think especially if you have a few family members helping you make them ahead of time, plus it’s lots of fun and you’ll be creating wonderful memories together.

ravioli dough I’m all about being organized and having everything prepped. I like to make the dough the night before, for 400 ravioli that’s around ten batches of dough, if I’m making 200, five batches of dough. Sometimes I’ll get up early and make all the dough in the morning but I’m not much of an early bird I work better at night.

The dough must always be covered and resting at room temperature so if they were stored in the fridge overnight you have to take them out and let them warm up, the dough will be more pliable and easier to work with.

I always make my dough in the food processor, it’s so fast and works like a charm every time. Making the dough in a well is not for me, especially for large amounts, I was taught that way but I’m all about the food processor method now.

ravioli making tools They also rolled out their ravioli by hand with a rolling pin and crimped each and everyone with a fork, I did that too back in the day but times have changed.

As the years went by I graduated to a pretty red pasta machine and I also use ravioli forms, the forms allow the ravioli to come out uniform in size, and I rarely have any that breakage when boiling.

When I first started making ravioli they would be crazy looking, some were long rectangles, short rectangles, big squares, short squares, thick dough, thin dough, not enough filling, air pockets all over, and many would break open when boiling, thank goodness I found the right tools!

ravioli doughravioli attachment But now fast forward to 2016 I discovered something even better and I don’t think I’ll ever go back to my pretty red crank style pasta roller, I’ll have to pass it down as a family heirloom because I now have a new and powerful friend, my Kitchen Aid pasta attachment!

Well it’s not really new, I bought it a couple of years ago but never used it, I think I was afraid it wouldn’t give me the same results as my oldie but goodie crank style. The brand new and never used attachment was sitting in a box in my pantry for so long that I had to Google how to  properly place it on the machine and use it.

You don’t realize how fatiguing it is to crank out 400 ravioli, when making so many we would take turns, but it’s a breeze with the pasta attachment because the machine does all the work for you, the power of that motor makes the most uniform dough, always consistent and smooth as silk, plus there’s a bonus, you’ll have both of your hands free and you won’t feel tired at all.

It’s amazing and I highly recommend it if you like to make a lot of fresh pasta, and I’m not being compensated to say it!

prepping ravioli  This past weekend I made 200 ravioli by myself and I wasn’t the least bit tired, I could have made another 100, no problem, the pasta attachment changed my life!

I prepped the fillings the night before because it’s a little time consuming and I like to get that out of the way. I made cheese, meat and butternut squash filling. I also love using piping bags for a more clean and efficient way of filling the ravioli forms, works like a charm and it’s much, much neater than using a spoon.

The forms have to be well floured all over including the zig zags before placing the dough on top, dusting them with flour will help them to seal and fall out of the forms without getting stuck.

making ravioli At this point you can also brush some water lightly all around the edges then the top layer of dough goes on. I use a small rolling pin and roll over all the zig zag lines and the surface of the dough, that will also help in getting the filling down into the holes.

homemade ravioli When it’s time to release the ravioli I turn the whole form upside down and grab a corner with my two fingers tugging a bit until the ravioli just fall out onto your work surface.

making raviolihomemade ravioli Then I’ll use a pasta crimper shown above, and score it through the zig zag lines which helps them come apart easy, one score usually does it.

homemade ravioli I always freeze mine by taking a cookie sheet, lining it with parchment paper and placing the ravioli single layer, never on top of each other or touching. When the pan is filled up I’ll put another piece of parchment on top then stick the whole pan in the freezer.

Meat ravioli usually take around a half hour to freeze, when they’re all frozen I’ll place them into freezer bags and they won’t stick together at all, you’ll be able to take out as many as needed.

butternut squash raviolibutternut squash ravioli Butternut squash as well as the cheese filling will take a good hour to freeze because of the softer and wetter filling.

homemade raviolihomemade ravioli Be sure to mark your bags!

Keep in mind you don’t have to make as many as I did, I don’t want to scare you off from doing this but if you’re going to embark on this adventure you might as well go big!

They taste at optimum freshness and flavor for at least four months in the freezer, so you have plenty of time to make them before a big event.

homemade ravioli

Like I said I have some other good tips and tricks in my archives here and here. In those posts and the other link above I”ll give you a visual on how I did it for a crowd, how much sauce to make for 400, the shallow disposable pans I used and of course pictures of the cooked ravioli.

I hope you give this a try someday, there’s nothing like homemade ravioli and just think of the fun memories you’ll be making!

Recipe is upon request, just send me an email.

You can also follow Proud Italian Cook on Instagram to see what else I’m cooking up during the week and especially all through the holidays.

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Cranberry Amaretto Clafoutis

cranberry amaretto clafoutis The holidays are upon us and I have just the dessert to impress your guests, a Cranberry Amaretto Clafoutis.

A clafoutis has all the makings of a very elegant dessert yet it can be very rustic also. What’s a clafoutis? It’s a French dessert that’s custard and flan like, it can be filled with a variety of different fresh fruit and when baked the sweet batter gets nice and puffy all around the fruit tasting very light and pudding like.

cranberry amaretto clafoutis ingredients It may look decadent but it’s a fooler because it’s neither heavy or overly sweet and that’s what I love about it, and to top it off,  it’s super easy to make!

cranberry amaretto clafoutis Slivered almonds embed themselves into the sweet and puffy batter that’s flavored with sweet almond liqueur that pairs so well with the slightly tart cranberries, this is screaming put on the coffee guests are stopping by!

cranberry amaretto clafoutiscranberry amaretto clafoutis

Scoop some out and serve it alongside fresh whipped cream, vanilla ice cream or as is, either way you’re going to love it, holiday cooking has officially begun!

Follow me on Instagram to see what I’m cooking up daily and through the holidays.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Cranberry Amaretto Clafoutis
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 cups fresh whole cranberries
  • ½ cup all purpose flour
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1½ cups, whole milk
  • 2 tablespoons, melted butter and a little extra for buttering pan
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons of amaretto or 1 teaspoon of almond extract, or 1 Tablespoon amaretto and ½ teaspoon of almond extract combined.
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ¼ cup slivered almonds
  • confectioners sugar for dusting
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 375 F. then butter your baking dish or ovenproof skillet.
  2. In a bowl combine flour, eggs, melted butter, baking powder, salt, milk, vanilla, amaretto or almond extract and half a cup of the sugar. Beat on high speed with a hand mixer until well combined. Set aside and let it rest.
  3. Take remaining quarter cup of sugar and coat it all over the cranberries, toss it into the buttered skillet and bake for 12 minutes. Remove from the oven.
  4. Give the batter one more whirl on high with the hand mixer after its been resting then pour it onto the cooked cranberries.
  5. Sprinkle with almonds then return to oven and bake another 35 minutes.
  6. It will be puffy when taken out of the oven but in a few minutes it will settle down then dust it with the powdered sugar and serve with whipped cream on the side.

 

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Butternut Squash Pizza with Sage Walnut Pesto

butternut squash pizza with sage pesto As promised I would like to announce the winner of the beautiful Lagostina Hammered Copper Pastaiola, and the winner is… DIANE KANTOR! Congratulations Diane, I will be contacting you by email to get your address so the company can ship it directly to you.

Can I just tell you something? I adore this pizza! It highlights roasted butternut squash on a bed of garlicky ricotta with touches of sage and walnut pesto floating around, the simple flavors of fall on top of crispy and crunchy pizza dough.

When making this pizza you’ll want to seek out a squash that has a long neck because that’s what you’ll be using to make those nice round slices which I think it adds so much to the presentation, don’t you?

sage and walnut pesto I was immediately drawn to the looks of this pizza when I saw a photo posted on none other than Pinterest but I wanted to add my own little twist with the sage and walnut pesto, I thought it would be extra delicious with little dollops all over the warm pizza, and guess what? I was right.

sage and walnut pesto I have so much sage still growing in my garden and this was another way to enjoy it, and as all fresh pesto’s it takes no time to whip it up. I also like using the sage pesto with other things like fish, chicken, pasta, root vegetables, swirled into mashed potatoes and risotto, the possibilities are endless and a little goes a long way and it just screams fall to me!

butternut squash pizza with sage pesto If you make your own pizza dough, I applaud you, I’m not that fond of working with yeast so I always buy my pizza dough, but fortunately for me I have an excellent source with excellent quality dough, so it makes my life easier.

butternut squash pizza with sage pesto

Serve this with a nice green salad and you’ll have a fantastic fall dinner!

(Follow me on Instagram to see what else I’m cooking up during the week)

5.0 from 1 reviews
Butternut Squash Pizza with Sage Walnut Pesto
 
This recipe is adapted from Alexandra's Kitchen
Author:
Ingredients
  • SAGE AND WALNUT PESTO
  • 1 cup sage leaves
  • ¾ cup parsley
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • ¾ cup toasted walnuts
  • ½ cup of grated Parmesan
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • and a squeeze of lemon for brightness
  • PIZZA
  • 1 dough ball, homemade or store bought, enough for 1 pizza
  • 1 butternut squash, look for a long neck so you can cut it into round slices, reserve the bulb part for something else.
  • ricotta
  • 1 smashed garlic clove
  • shredded dry mozzarella
  • parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. FOR THE PESTO
  2. Place everything into a food processor, except for the olive oil, I used my mini processor.
  3. Pulse it, chopping the nuts and combining everything then start drizzling the oil down the tube until it has a loose consistency characteristic of pesto. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. FOR THE PIZZA AND EARLIER IN THE DAY
  5. Cut the long neck off of a butternut squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, then cut quarter inch round slices..
  6. Roast the slices in a hot 400 degree oven drizzled with olive oil, single layer until tender, set aside.
  7. I like to let my dough sit out for a couple of hours so it becomes nice and pliable.
  8. When ready to cook, heat oven to a hot 500 degrees, oil your pizza pan then sprinkle some corn meal or polenta on the bottom.
  9. Dust your fingers with a little flour then work your dough into the pan stretching it with your finger tips until it reaches the edges, then place it into the oven for 5 minutes, no longer! Then remove it.
  10. Dough might rise up but just punch it down.
  11. Quickly mix up some ricotta with the smashed garlic and a little salt and pepper, enough to swipe and cover the whole bottom of the dough with just a thin layer.
  12. Sprinkle a little mozzarella on top then add the butternut squash rounds filling the top.
  13. Add some grated parmesan on top of the squash, then brush olive oil onto the edges of the crust then do a quick drizzle on top.
  14. Place pizza into the oven until it reaches a deep golden brown on the crust edges and bottom.
  15. While still warm add dollops of the sage and walnut pesto.

 

 

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